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RSSCategory: Q&A

Joe Buck

Joe Buck

| January 3, 2017 | 0 Comments

Joe Buck had the good fortune of watching his father, Jack Buck, broadcast countless games as the voice of the St. Louis Cardinals. But when the time came to step up to the booth, the younger Buck made the most of his opportunity. Now he is the lead Major League Baseball and National Football League announcer for Fox Sports, having just completed his 19th World Series and preparing to call his fifth Super Bowl. In his recent memoir, “Lucky Bastard,” Buck recounts his rise, one that almost came crashing down in 2011 when complications from anesthesia during a hair-plug procedure cost him his voice for nearly a year—an absence he previously attributed to “a virus.” He has since recovered to cement his status as a leading voice in sports broadcasting

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Tom Penn

Tom Penn

| December 2, 2016 | 0 Comments

Tom Penn has the chance to do what few get to do in professional sports: build a team from the ground up. But it’s not just the launch of LAFC, the new Major League Soccer team in Los Angeles, that he’s overseeing. Penn is also helping develop a new downtown stadium set to debut in 2018 when the team begins play. Penn previously spent four seasons as vice-president of basketball operations and assistant general manager of the NBA’s Portland Trailblazers and seven years as assistant general manager of the Memphis Grizzlies in addition to serving as an NBA analyst for ESPN. But in building LAFC, he has had to engage a range of sports and entertainment luminaries as co-owners while convincing new fans to jump on the team’s bandwagon. In this interview, Penn

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| November 4, 2016 | 0 Comments

Katrina Adams

Katrina Adams has accomplished many firsts at the U.S. Tennis Association, including being the first African-American, first former player and youngest person to be chairman, president and CEO. She also recently became the first person to be reappointed to a second consecutive term. Adams had a 12-year pro career that saw her ranked as high as No. 67 in singles and No. 8 in doubles. She then served on the WTA board and WTA’s Players Association before joining the USTA board in 2005. During her time at the helm, she has overseen $500 million in improvements to the U.S. Open and construction of a new tennis center with 100 courts set to open in Orlando. In this interview with SportsTravel’s Jason Gewirtz, conducted live on stage at the TEAMS ’16 Conference & Expo, Adams discusses her start in the sport

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| September 12, 2016 | 0 Comments

Joe De Sena

Joe De Sena has been an entrepreneur almost from the beginning, selling fireworks at age 8, building a pool-cleaning business and later founding a Wall Street trading firm. But his true passion was in health and fitness, and adventure racing specifically. After competing in dozens of long-distance races, he founded Spartan Race in 2010. The obstacle race series separated itself from the pack by timing participants and treating the experience as a legitimate sport, one with a potential future at the Olympic Games. Today, the Reebok Spartan Race offers 3-, 8- and 12-mile events that together attract more than 1 million participants annually across 170 events in 28 countries, including races in Europe and Asia.In this interview with SportsTravel’s Jason Gewirtz

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| August 5, 2016 | 0 Comments

Chuck Wielgus

In the world of national governing bodies, it’s rare to see an executive director whose tenure can be measured in decades. But Chuck Wielgus has found a winning formula at USA Swimming since taking over in 1997. In fact, he just received a contract extension through 2020. Among other accomplishments, he led the efforts to take the Olympic swimming trials from a natatorium to an arena, developed new corporate and television partnerships, and created the USA Swimming Foundation. His athletes have fared exceedingly well at the Olympic Summer Games, winning an average of 31 medals at each of the last three Games. He has also weathered significant controversy involving sexual abuse by coaches, which led to the Safe Sport program. In this interview with SportsTravel’s Jason Gewirtz, Wielgus discusses the upcoming Rio Games, progress

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| July 1, 2016 | 0 Comments

Rob Manfred

When Rob Manfred was named commissioner of Major League Baseball in 2014, he took on the role of leading the game into an uncertain future. But his history with MLB made him an ideal choice. From 1998–2012 he was executive vice-president for labor relations and human resources, negotiating three new labor agreements. He later served as executive vice-president for economics and league affairs, and chief operating officer. Now he faces a host of issues that confront pro baseball including negotiating a new player contract, reducing the length of games and engaging the next generation of fans. He has also taken a strong interest in the league’s special events, abandoning a traditional rotation for hosting the All-Star Game. In this interview with SportsTravel’s Jason Gewirtz, Manfred discusses the league’s special events,

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| May 9, 2016 | 0 Comments

Sean McManus

Since being named chairman of CBS Sports in 2011, Sean McManus has overseen all operations across CBS Sports properties. That has included negotiations for high-profile events such as the NCAA men’s basketball tournament, the PGA Tour and Thursday and Sunday NFL games, as well as the rebranding of CBS Sports Network. Since joining CBS in 1996, he has held a variety of key roles, including president of both CBS Sports and CBS News from 2005–2011. In April, CBS and Turner announced an eight-year, $8.8 billion contract extension for the NCAA men’s basketball tournament through 2032 that includes all digital rights to the championship. And in February, the NFL awarded CBS a new package of Thursday night games as well. In this interview with SportsTravel’s Jason Gewirtz, McManus discusses the NCAA renewal

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| April 1, 2016 | 0 Comments

Janet Evans

When it comes to understanding the athlete experience at a major international competition, Janet Evans knows of what she speaks. In 1987, at the age of 15, she broke world swimming records in the 400m, 800m and 1500m freestyle. At the 1988 Olympics, she won three gold medals, then followed in 1992 with another gold and a silver. At the 1996 Games she failed to medal, but nonetheless became part of Olympic history by handing the torch to Muhhamad Ali in one of the Games’ most iconic moments. Today, she is vice-chair and director of athlete relations for the LA 2024 bid committee, and has taken on the charge of making sure athletes’ voices are heard as Los Angeles competes against Paris, Rome and Budapest. In this interview with SportsTravel’s Jason Gewirtz, Evans discusses the role of athletes in the bid, her start in swimming and the power of the Olympic movement.

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| March 3, 2016 | 0 Comments

Leigh Steinberg

There was a time when it seemed every top pick in the NFL draft was represented by Leigh Steinberg. And that wasn’t too far from the truth. At the height of his career through the 1990s, Steinberg represented eight first picks and several dozen first-rounders. When Cameron Crowe was doing research for “Jerry Maguire,” it was Steinberg he followed around to study. But Steinberg’s career faced a serious setback after a public battle with alcohol that cost him his agent certification. Sober for six years and having regained his certificate, he now represents University of Memphis star Paxton Lynch in the 2016 draft. He also has formed Steinberg Ventures to raise money for products that can prevent concussions, an issue on which he has advocated for years. In this interview with SportsTravel’s Jason Gewirtz, Steinberg discusses the impact of concussions, making “Jerry Maguire”

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Ari Fleischer

Ari Fleischer

| February 1, 2016 | 0 Comments

Ari Fleischer

There seems to be no shortage of sports-related scandals. Major League Baseball has been battling issues over player steroid use for years. International federations are being investigated by governments. Even underinflated footballs have caused a stir. But when those types of incidents occur, Ari Fleischer is there to help. As White House press secretary under President George W. Bush from 2001–2003, he oversaw communications for the administration’s share of crises, including the 9/11 attack. When he left, he moved to New York and formed Ari Fleischer Sports Communications to provide media training and crisis response to sports clients that have included leagues and teams and, recently, Peyton Manning in his fight against HGH-use allegations. In this interview with SportsTravel’s Jason Gewirtz, Fleischer discusses how his business began, the advice he offers athletes most and why everyone lost in Deflategate.

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